Symposium I/O [Input/Outbut] exploring computational subcultures

Appel de communications
15 Octobre 2016

I/O [Input/Outbut] Symposium Exploring Computational Subcultures

I/O Symposium: Exploring Computational Subcultures
Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology, Concordia University
November 24 and 25, 2016

Call for Papers/Panels/Artworks

The history of computation is rich with narratives of hackers, tinkerers and enthusiasts. Myriad computational subcultures have emerged that both orbit and impinge upon larger computing, gaming, sonic and visual cultures,from microcomputing platforms to gaming hardware and beyond. By directly engaging with the various elements of any given digital machine, these subcultures alter our relationship to technology, rendering acts of computational creativity, modification, and reverse engineering as modes of critical knowledge production.

Through scholarly & practicebased modes of knowledge production, the two day I/O [Input/Output] Symposium will focus its attention on computational subcultures and their communal, political economic and material conditions. This symposium will feature a variety of programming, including workshops, panels, performances and keynote lectures, as well as a small exhibition. CoPresented by the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology, the Hexagram Research Creation Network, and the Technoculture, Art and Games Research Centre, the event will feature a Keynote address by Anders Carlsson aka Goto80, a scholar and practitioner who specializes in the demoscene, retrotech hardware hacking and electronic music composition.

I/O is seeking paper, panel and practicebased proposals for inclusion in its programme. Panel proposals may be comprised of either three (20 minute) or four (15 minute) presentations. Individual paper submissions will be curated into themed panels: performers/works for exhibition will be considered separately. As such we invite submissions from practitioners, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and recent graduates which critically address the overarching topic of computational subcultures and their social, cultural and material conditions.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

The Demoscene
hardware hacking
homebrew software development
blockchain and virtual economies
live coding
interactive fiction
fan studies
ROM hacking
game modification
MAME and other forms of emulation
wearable computing / technologies
piracy cultures
post internet music genres

For paper submissions, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words, along with a short (150 word) bio. Panel submissions should be as follows: panel description (300 words), individual presenter abstract (200 words) plus short bios (150 words). Submissions for the exhibition: please send a short video or no more than 5 images of your work plus a maximum 300 word description and a 150 word bio.

All submissions must be sent to symposium cochair Skot Deeming at no later than October 15th, 2016. Successful applicants will be notified by October 20th.